Legend Of Spouting Horn

From Wikipedia: According to Hawaiian folklore, a giant lizard (“mo’o” in the Hawaiian language) once protected this area of the island. One day, a young man named Liko challenged the lizard, which threatened visitors to the area who came to fish or swim. During their battle, Liko thrust a sharp stick into the lizard’s mouth. Liko then jumped into the ocean, luring the lizard in the water. Liko then swam through a small lava tube in the rocks leading to the surface. The lizard followed Liko and got stuck in the lava tube, or blowhole. Today, you can hear the lizard’s roar every time the Spouting Horn Blowhole blasts into the air.

Spouting Horn is one of the most photographed locations on Kauai and if you time it right, with high surf and good light you can see why…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

For me, one of the decisions is whether to photograph in Vertical (above) or horizontal orientation…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

And whether to position myself with the late light falling on the Spouting Horn (above or, to move around and get the water backlit against the warm colors of sunset…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

Once the water begins to erupt from the hole, I press the shutter and hold it until the spray has dissipated.  Back in the digital darkroom I look through a sequence until I find an image with the water forming an interesting shape or pattern in the spray.  Be sure to look closely, you never know what (or who) you’ll find…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

In this series of images I chose to keep my shutter speed fairly high to capture the power of the water as it sprays into the air.  Shooting with a slower shutter speed is also fun to blur the spray.  I typically scroll through my apertures resulting in a variety of shutter speeds when I first get to a location.  When I find the  amount of stop action or blur I like for a given situation, I simply click a series of frames and select my favorite from the sequence.  Stay tuned.