A Special Wish For You…

Cruising The Napali

A visit to Kauai is not complete without taking a cruise along the Napali Coast of Kauai.  I prefer late afternoon trips for the beautiful light.  The shadows bring out the detail in the rugged cliffs that you don’t get earlier in the day…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

As a beautiful graphic I like the top photo but, to add a sense of scale I also zoomed out and included a boat cruising along the coast…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

We were fortunate to see Humpback whales along the way.  With only a very short moment to capture their appearance I pre-focuesd on a spot in the water so that when they emerged, it was easy for the camera to acquire focus…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

While we were stopped working the whales, I looked down and saw the gorgeous reflections in the water and made a couple of quick clicks…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

As a final goodbye we saw one last rainbow as we headed back to Port Allen…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

What a way to end a year of travel.  Stay tuned.

 

This N That From Kauai

Besides the beautiful sweeping landscapes and seascapes, there are some little treasures in the nooks and crannies if you look.  Some of my favorites…

A little cove right by our condo in Princeville.  I used my lowest ISO and my smallest aperture to get 30 seconds to blur the water…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

A popular photo spot on the North Shore is to photograph the pier at Hanalei Bay.  I climbed under the pier to capture the waves coming in through the pilings. A small aperture enabled me to shoot at 1.4 of a second to capture the movement of the water…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

A forest at Hanalei Bay caught my attention and I pulled out my Canon G11 infrared converted camera to make this image.  I processed it in the digital darkroom adding some warmth from NIK Color Efex Pro 4 Brilliance and Warmth to get this look…

Canon G11 Infrared Converted

 

In between shoots we dodged the liquid sunshine…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

When photographing in the Hawaiian Islands, every photo seems to have a water theme whether it’s in the form of waves, rain or even the lush vegetation that flourishes in this climate.  It’s a photographer’s paradise.  Stay tuned.

Legend Of Spouting Horn

From Wikipedia: According to Hawaiian folklore, a giant lizard (“mo’o” in the Hawaiian language) once protected this area of the island. One day, a young man named Liko challenged the lizard, which threatened visitors to the area who came to fish or swim. During their battle, Liko thrust a sharp stick into the lizard’s mouth. Liko then jumped into the ocean, luring the lizard in the water. Liko then swam through a small lava tube in the rocks leading to the surface. The lizard followed Liko and got stuck in the lava tube, or blowhole. Today, you can hear the lizard’s roar every time the Spouting Horn Blowhole blasts into the air.

Spouting Horn is one of the most photographed locations on Kauai and if you time it right, with high surf and good light you can see why…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

For me, one of the decisions is whether to photograph in Vertical (above) or horizontal orientation…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

And whether to position myself with the late light falling on the Spouting Horn (above or, to move around and get the water backlit against the warm colors of sunset…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

Once the water begins to erupt from the hole, I press the shutter and hold it until the spray has dissipated.  Back in the digital darkroom I look through a sequence until I find an image with the water forming an interesting shape or pattern in the spray.  Be sure to look closely, you never know what (or who) you’ll find…

Nikon D4, AF-S 28-300mm 3.5-5.6 VR

 

In this series of images I chose to keep my shutter speed fairly high to capture the power of the water as it sprays into the air.  Shooting with a slower shutter speed is also fun to blur the spray.  I typically scroll through my apertures resulting in a variety of shutter speeds when I first get to a location.  When I find the  amount of stop action or blur I like for a given situation, I simply click a series of frames and select my favorite from the sequence.  Stay tuned.